Study Permit

Study Permits are for Foreign Nationals who wish to study at an educational institution in Canada. Dependents (either a spouse or children), of those who are temporarily residing in Canada, are required to obtain a Study Permit in order to Study in Canada. These dependents will receive a Study Permit which has the same validity as the holder of the Work Permit or Temporary Resident Permit.

Minor children who are planning on attending pre-school, primary school or secondary school are not required to obtain a Study Permit, (except for children who are accompanying their parents who hold Temporary Resident Visas). All Foreign Nationals who have attained the age of majority at the time of application must obtain a Study Permit to attend any educational institution.

Temporary Resident Visa (TRV)

Temporary Resident Visas allow Foreign Nationals to enter Canada temporarily for either pleasure or business visits. Foreign Nationals who are residents of certain countries do not require a Temporary Resident Visa to enter Canada (please see list below). Foreign Nationals of all other countries must obtain a Temporary Resident Visa prior to entering Canada. Spouses and dependants of those who are temporarily residing in Canada might also be required to obtain a Temporary Resident Visa, depending on their country of origin.


A Temporary Resident Visa does not permit a Foreign National to work while in Canada. When deciding which type of immigration document to apply for, the distinction between a Temporary Resident Visa and a Work Permit should be kept in mind. A Temporary Resident Visa allows a Foreign National to enter and remain in Canada for a specific period of time.

Foreign Nationals wanting to work in Canada are required to obtain a Work Permit. The Foreign National may also require a Temporary Resident Visa should they wish to travel in and out of Canada. The requirement to obtain a Temporary Resident Visa will depend on the Foreign National’s country of origin.

A Foreign National who is already in Canada on a Temporary Resident Visa wish to commence employment in Canada, he or she must obtain a Work Permit from a Canadian Consulate, Embassy or High Commission abroad.

There are three types of Temporary Resident Visas, they are:
• Single Entry Visa – this allows the Foreign National only one entry into Canada;
• Multiple Entry Visa – this allows the Foreign National unlimited entry into Canada pending the validity of the Visa; and
• Transit Visa – this allows entry to Canada for Foreign Nationals who are traveling and who’s flight or bus stops in Canada for less that forty-eight (48) hours, but who’s country of origin is one that requires a visa.

Work Permit


Temporary Resident Visas allow Foreign Nationals to enter Canada temporarily for either pleasure or business visits. Foreign Nationals who are residents of certain countries do not require a Temporary Resident Visa to enter Canada (please see list below). Foreign Nationals of all other countries must obtain a Temporary Resident Visa prior to entering Canada. Spouses and dependants of those who are temporarily residing in Canada might also be required to obtain a Temporary Resident Visa, depending on their country of origin.

A Temporary Resident Visa does not permit a Foreign National to work while in Canada. When deciding which type of immigration document to apply for, the distinction between a Temporary Resident Visa and a Work Permit should be kept in mind. A Temporary Resident Visa allows a Foreign National to enter and remain in Canada for a specific period of time.
Foreign Nationals wanting to work in Canada are required to obtain a Work Permit. The Foreign National may also require a Temporary Resident Visa should they wish to travel in and out of Canada. The requirement to obtain a Temporary Resident Visa will depend on the Foreign National’s country of origin.
A Foreign National who is already in Canada on a Temporary Resident Visa wish to commence employment in Canada, he or she must obtain a Work Permit from a Canadian Consulate, Embassy or High Commission abroad.

There are three types of Temporary Resident Visas, they are:
• Single Entry Visa – this allows the Foreign National only one entry into Canada;
• Multiple Entry Visa – this allows the Foreign National unlimited entry into Canada pending the validity of the Visa; and
• Transit Visa – this allows entry to Canada for Foreign Nationals who are traveling and who’s flight or bus stops in Canada for less that forty-eight (48) hours, but who’s country of origin is one that requires a visa.
Individuals who are neither Canadian Permanent Residents, nor Canadian Citizens, and who wish to temporarily reside in Canada for employment purposes will likely have to apply for a Work Permit. A Work Permit is not issued for persons wanting to come to Canada to look for work. It is only issued once an offer of employment has been made.

It should be noted that a Work Permit is not an employment contract. It is strictly for the purposes of allowing a foreign national to work in Canada to fill a labor shortage and to support economic growth in Canada.
A Work Permit usually contains specific terms and conditions, including the start and end dates of the employment, name of employer, location of employment, and job title. If the Foreign National does not abide by the terms and conditions set out in the Work Permit, the Foreign National may be prosecuted and/or asked to leave Canada. The employer may also receive disciplinary action or face charges.

Most Work Permits are employer-specific and cannot be used to work in another company. Should the employment be terminated, the Foreign National must apply for a new Work Permit in order to work in a new position. In some cases, a Foreign National will receive an “Open” Work Permit, which will allow them to work in any position, and for any employer in Canada.

Canadian Permanent Resident Card

Applying for your first card, renewals, and appeals for residency challenges abroad

Canadian Permanent Resident Cards (PR) are required for all Permanent Canadian residents who wish to travel abroad to be able to establish their identity at the Port of Entry and to re-enter Canada. The PR Card is valid for five years. We can assist you in the process of obtaining your card for the first time or apply to extend your current one with regular or URGENT basis.
If you have spent a considerable amount of time outside of Canada since landing, especially in the past 5 years, you may need special counseling prior to applying to extend your PR Card. If your card has already expired, and you are outside of Canada, you need to know your rights! You would need to apply to get a Travel Document to re-enter Canada, and at that point, the Embassy or Visa Office abroad may make the decision to revoke your Permanent Residence status. It is strongly recommended you consult with an experienced Immigration consultant prior to taking any action so you know your rights. You will also want to know if and how an appeal can be made if you are eligible.
We are here to help you. Contact us.

Canadian Citizenship Application

A Person Is A Citizen If They Were:

• Born in Canada after February 15, 1977; or
• Born outside of Canada after February 14, 1977 and at the time of his birth, one of his parents, other than a parent who adopted him/her, was a Canadian citizen; or
• A person has been granted or acquired citizenship.
To become a Canadian citizen, an individual must be at least 18 years old to apply for Canadian citizenship. An individual must also have permanent resident status in Canada, and that status must not be in doubt. For example, an individual must not be the subject of an immigration investigation, an immigration inquiry or a removal order (an order from Canadian officials to leave Canada).

Residence In Canada


To become Canadian citizens, adults must have resided in Canada for at least four years (1,460 days) iduring the six years before applying. Adult applicants must be physically present for at least 183 days during each of four calender years that are fully or partially within the six years immediately before the date of application. Thses requirements do not apply to children under 18 year of age.
Individuals who are applying to become a Canadian citizen must submit an application and write a citizenship test. Individuals, who are between 14 to 64, will have to provide proof of their ability to speak and listen in English or French when submitting their citizenship application. In addition, a test must be written within the application process, the test requires knowledge of English or French, a general knowledge about Canada’s history, geography and political system.

Criminal History

An individual may not become a citizen if they:
• have been convicted of an indictable (criminal) offence or an offence under the Citizenship Act in the four years before you applied;
• Are currently charged with an indictable offence or an offence under the Citizenship Act;
• Are in prison, on parole or on probation;
• Are under a removal order (have been ordered by Canadian officials to leave Canada);
• Are under investigation for, are charged with, or have been convicted of a war crime or a crime against humanity; or
If an individual is on probation or are charged with an offence and are awaiting trial, it is suggested that they wait until after the probation has ended or the trial is over to apply for citizenship.
Note that that time in prison or on parole may not count as residence in Canada. Time on probation may not count as residence in Canada if an individual were convicted of an offense.

Citizenship For A Child Under 18:


• The person applying is the child’s parent, adoptive parent or legal guardian
• The child is a permanent resident, but does not need to have resided in Canada for four years; and
• One parent is already a Canadian citizen or is applying to become a citizen at the same time. This also applies to adoptive parents.
For further information, please feel free to consult us.

Canadian And Other Countries Passport

Canada started using new technology with their passports in 2013. Now, all Canadian passports are e- Passports. The difference between these new passports and the more traditional ones is that ePassports have electronic chips in them that can be scanned. Upon being scanned by an agent at the border, they will have instantaneous electronic access to all of the passport holder’s information.

This technology protects one’s personal information by locking the information onto the chip so that it cannot be changed electronically. Even if a fraudster were to change the printed information on the passport, they would not be able to change the data on the chip. Immigration officials would be able to catch fraudsters by comparing the information on the chip to the written information in the passport.

This system is used by most countries in the world and really has little effect on the validity of the passport. It is simply a security feature in the same vein as a watermark. Passport photos must meet very strict specifications such as:
• Background color
• Shadows
• Dimensions of the photo
• The photograph’s subject’s face cannot be obscured by anything like glasses or head-wear. An exception to this rule is if the headwear is religious in nature and does not cover the entire face.

Because of these specifications, many people choose to use professional, commercial photographers to make sure t hat their passport photos are accepted. However, it is not necessary to use a professional photographer. Applicants who wish to create their own passport photos are encouraged to read the specifications closely. Passport photographs can be in color or in black and white.
The length of time it takes for the passport to expire depends on the type of passport one might hold. There are five-year passports and ten-year passports. Ten year passports are somewhat more expensive than the five-year variety.
We assist Canadian citizens to apply and renew their Canadian passports.

Passport for different countries

We also help you to apply for passport s/renewal of passports of different countries.

Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIA)

Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIA)’s – formerly known as Labour Market Opinions (LMOs), the prerequisite for Work Permits for Temporary Foreign Workers to come to Canada.
Similarly, candidates abroad interested in immigrating, and International students whose Post Grad work permits are due to expire, need to know how to have their employer ‘sponsor’ them via the Labour Market Impact Assessment LMIA process (previously known as LMOs). Hiring foreign workers in Canada can be difficult and Sapphire Immigration can help you.
We can help you navigate this complex and exacting process, from the initial screening to see if the position and candidate is eligible for an LMIA, to drafting the ad and job description, salary positioning, to the full application for an LMIA.
Upon successful issuance, we can then assist the foreign worker on how best get his Work Permit in the fastest way possible.
This is a volatile program, and not for the meek or unprepared. You will require expert guidance in an LMIA application.
We invite you to call us to set up to book a consultation that is reserved just for you!

Affidavits/Commissioner Of Oaths

We have certified “Commissioner for Taking Affidavits” for the Attorney General of the province of Ontario. We help our clients to write invitation letters, affidavits and statutory declarations for different immigration purposes.

For detail information, you may visit our office or contact us.